How to Cure and Clean Your Dutch Oven

Cast Iron Dutch ovens are a versatile kitchen tool that can be used on your stove top or placed in your oven. Whether you're making a delicious winter stew or you're creating a delectable dessert, your Dutch oven's ability to evenly...

Cast Iron Dutch ovens are a versatile kitchen tool that can be used on your stove top or placed in your oven. Whether you're making a delicious winter stew or you're creating a delectable dessert, your Dutch oven's ability to evenly distribute heat makes it ideal for cooking a variety of dishes. If you've recently purchased a cast iron Dutch oven and you're unsure of how to properly care for it, we've provided a quick and easy guide to curing and cleaning your newest kitchen tool.

Lodge Pro Logic Black Cast Iron Dutch Oven
Lodge Pro Logic Black Cast Iron Dutch Oven

Curing Your New Dutch Oven 

Curing is an essential procedure that every Dutch oven owner must preform. The process prevents your pot from rusting while also forming a coating that inhibits your food from sticking to the surface. Fortunately, the process is quite simple and doesn't require a lot of time.

  1. The first few steps in the curing process depend on whether or not the pot is brand new or used. If it's used and has a layer of rust covering its inside, you'll need to give it a good scrubbing before using fine-grade sandpaper to remove the rust and expose the metal interior. Once that's finished, the following steps apply to both new and used Dutch ovens.
  2. To remove the wax coating often found on a new Dutch oven or the metal dust remaining on a repurposed one, simply wash the pot with hot soapy water.
  3. Next, place the pot in your oven with its lid on, and allow it to heat up to at least 200 degrees Fahrenheit.
  4. Once the Dutch oven has reached the desired temperature, pull it out and add a small amount of oil to the pot. Wearing an oven mitt, and using a cloth spread the oil evenly over the pot's interior and exterior surface.
  5. Place the pot back into the oven and turn the heat up to 350 degrees Fahrenheit and leave it to cure for an hour. Expect a small amount of smoke to rise from your oven during this stage.
  6. Removing the pot from the oven and allowing it to cool down slowly is the last step in the curing process. Although, placing your Dutch oven in the fridge or freezer to speed up the cool down may seem like a good idea, it can actually crack or warp the pot.

Lodge Logic Double Dutch Oven
Lodge Logic Double Dutch Oven

Cleaning Your Dutch Oven

While the debate on how to properly clean a Dutch oven is very much alive and kicking, the truth behind the matter lies in the owner's preference. Many individuals believe soap and water should never be used to remove leftover food. Instead, they prefer heating their Dutch oven with the lid on until all debris has disintegrated. However, just as many Dutch oven owners feel soap and water is the best way to guarantee their pot is completely clean.

Whether you choose the heating method or you stick with soap and water, once your Dutch oven is clean, you must pour a few drops of oil into the pot and gently rub it in with a cloth to ensure the surface does not rust.

If you're looking for further info on how to care for your kitchen tools, please contact us today to view a variety of helpful tips.